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Nurturing Emotional Ownership Makes for a Stronger Organization
Monday, August 26, 2013 6:45 AM

While economic conditions may be improving, some credit unions continue to face challenges that can only be overcome with a completely dedicated workforce. But how do you get your employees – regardless of their job title or responsibilities – to share the same level of dedication?

Keith Hughey, senior consultant with John M. Floyd & Associates (JMFA), says creating a culture where employees maintain a clear emotional connection between their efforts and the resulting benefit for the organization makes for a happier, more productive work environment.

“If the voices of your employees are heard and their opinions are valued, they feel more connected and have a greater appreciation of the relationship between their actions and overall results for the short- and long-term,” he says. “It’s called ‘emotional ownership’.”

In the work environment, Hughey says this emotional ownership can result from giving employees ownership in the process – even though they may not have direct participation in the profits and losses of the institution. For employees to feel this connection, they need to know the following:

  • Where the institution is going (the vision);
  • Why it is going in that direction (the mission or purpose);
  • How you intend to get there (the values everyone will honor, as well as an action plan to help you achieve the vision);
  • When you plan to arrive at that destination; and perhaps most importantly
  • What role they play in making that vision become the new reality.

“To create a sense of emotional ownership in the workplace, managers need to make those around them feel appreciated by sincerely and objectively listening to all of their ideas and, more importantly, acting on the ones that have merit,” suggests Hughey. “As a result of these simple efforts, a higher degree of dedication and enthusiasm will be apparent at all levels of the organization.”